heating your home

Help Support The Pipe:

tkt96

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 11, 2005
Messages
614
I live in CT and use oil for heat and hot water and wondered how much others that live in the north use/spend to heat their house.

I have about a 1000 sq ft house and use about 800 gallons of oil, roughly $3000 a year. Thermostat never set above 64 degrees when home and 58 at night or when we are out.

I put in new windows this year so hopefully that helps the bills but i still have a really old furnace and probably little to no insulation in the walls.

what is everyone that lives up north paying?


edit: didn't mean to put this in the cockpit, mods feel free to move it to the pipe
 
Last edited:

yasir1212

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2004
Messages
1,771
Best thing would be to get rid of that old, inefficient furnace and get a new one, if you can afford to do it. If you do, get rid of the oil and go with natural gas.

I'm not sure about CT but in NJ they have programs where the state will help out with some of the costs if you qualify. If you have little to no insulation in the walls, instead of tearing down the entire inside of the house to put in insulation, they have companies that will do it without any major work. Usually they just drill a small hole outside in the siding or something and blow in insulation that way.
 

FROG

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 29, 2008
Messages
902
I agree with yasser. A new furnace will make a huge difference, and if you can get on natural gas that would help too. Insulation is key, I would look into that first.
 

optimus_prime

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2005
Messages
978
MN resident. Furnace is killing you. The most I paid last winter was $165 for Feb. and I have a natural gas furnace with a 2800 square foot house. If you have an attic, make sure its insulated properly. Hope it helps.
 

JohnnyCleveland

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2003
Messages
1,186
I live in CT and use oil for heat and hot water and wondered how much others that live in the north use/spend to heat their house.

I have about a 1000 sq ft house and use about 800 gallons of oil, roughly $3000 a year. Thermostat never set above 64 degrees when home and 58 at night or when we are out.

I put in new windows this year so hopefully that helps the bills but i still have a really old furnace and probably little to no insulation in the walls.

what is everyone that lives up north paying?


edit: didn't mean to put this in the cockpit, mods feel free to move it to the pipe
You are pissing money out the window quite literally. Like others have mentioned, you need to upgrade the heating/efficiency of your home. There's no need to pay that type of cash to heat 1,000 sq. feet. I have 3,000+ sq/ft with geothermal furnace and a pellet stove in a 500 sq/ft addition. My biggest bill last winter was approx $150. I bought $300 worth of wood pellets that I burned through as well.

Get some people out to your home that know what they're talking about and go from there. New windows are a great start but without proper insulation, you're still behind the curve. They go hand and hand. It's almost like leaving the **** window open.

Good luck. Let us know what you find out.
 

Mitch

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2005
Messages
5,149
My sister's house in MA goes through 5 to 600 gallons of heating oil in a winter in her 1000 sq ft house built in the 50s. Don't know the cost, but a lot less.
 

Austin Milbarge

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2005
Messages
908
I live in north Jersey and paid about $750 for natural gas heat last winter. I live in a roughly 2000 sq/ft townhouse built in the late 80's with no upgrades to windows or insulation and a 12 year old forced air furnace. Thermostat set to 70 when we're home, 67 at night and 60 when no one's home. The only upgrade is when we bought the place I put in a programmable thermostat.
 

4spuds

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2006
Messages
409
Get something that will efficiently burn all the Jepp/CFM/FOM revisions we've done during the year.
I'm pretty sure there's enough energy there to a small country.
Either that or run them through a shredder and blow them into your attic for cheap insulation.
 

mckpickle

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2004
Messages
9,993
We built a energy star with geothermal heat back in 08. The biggest thing I learned was that insulation and the environmental envelope is the most important. Sealing every single opening will save a ton. The geo runs off electric. We see a wintertime increase of about 200 a month in the cold months. I figured out last year that we spent about 750$ for the season to heat 3400 sq ft. Granted the initial cost was about 12-15K over spec built homes but I'm saving around 3K a year on what similar sized homes spend on oil.
 

irishpilot84

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2006
Messages
1,520
Definitely look into getting insulation pumped in. They come in and cut a whole at the top of the wall near the ceiling and pump the insulation down into the wall cavity. It adds an R value above what normal rolled fiberglass could give you and it adds sound proofing. Obviously you will have drywall, spackling, and painting to do but it will pay for itself in the long run. Other then that I would run around with a few bottles of spray foam and caulk and make sure all cracks are sealed and replace the weather stripping surrounding exterior doors. I think you could cut your bill in half without having to replace your furnace.
 

isenhart

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2006
Messages
532
For a cheap do it yourself leak detector. Get some incense sticks or something else that puts out a lot of smoke and smell you can stand. Then go turn your HVAC fan on high and move the smoke around all the doors, windows, outlets, and light switches/fixtures. If your house has duct work that goes outside, like a crawl space or attic, sealing up the ducts could boost your efficiency 20%. With the HVAC fan still on high move your smoke around all the ducts and seems. Then turn off your HVAC and put some kind of high volume fan, like a 20" box fan in a window and try to seal around it. Turn it on high to create a positive pressure in your house, then repeat the smoke test. Flip the fan around to create a low pressure in your house and do the smoke test again. $10.00 worth of caulk and a couple hours of time could save you hundreds in heating and cooling. I'd start there first.
 

fazole

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 28, 2005
Messages
3,460
If you can't afford all that, turn down the thermostat, and just use an indoor kerosene or propane heater designed for that purpose in the room you spend the most time in. Also a must in case the power goes out. You can get good one's from Ace Hardware.
 

mooser

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2004
Messages
437
I am a WI resident....everyone is right about insulation and sealing everything up....

I heat almost an even 5000 sq ft and 900 sq ft garage for about 1500.00 with natural gas. my house furnace is variable speed blower with a modulating gas valve. My garage furnace is a Modine.

Natural Gas is the way to go if you cant do Geo thermal
 

hjnu7

Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2011
Messages
12
I agree with many of these posts, however, I will share in order of cost.

1) Caulking can make a big difference on how much heat stays in and cold stays out. There was a smoke test mentioned above, but just make sure you caulk all windows and doors where applicable. Weatherstripping can also play a major factor for doors.
2) Blowing in insulation in your attic. Obviously, this works best of your have done this in conjunction with #1. However, this will keep heat from escaping on the winter. In turn, your house will stay warmer longer.
3) Trying to convert your unit to natural gas. When determining if this is possible, I had to consult a heating repair indianapolis company. I would advise you to do the same. Natural gas is very cheap, and is predicted to stay that way due to the amount that we have here domestically.
4) A new natural gas unit. Plain and simple, this will be your best option, especially if you have sealed your house well.

I know this seem pretty straightforward, but I think it's important for you to know your options! Good luck!
 

Morophine

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2007
Messages
81
Might want to consider a radiant barrier too. Not only does it help in the summer time but it will reflect radiant heat back into the house during the winter time (only if you consider laying it on top of your existing insulation rather than stapling it to the rafters). It cost about 100 dollars for a 1000 sqft roll.
 

RonDun

Active Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2011
Messages
25
If you can't afford all that, turn down the thermostat, and just use an indoor kerosene or propane heater designed for that purpose in the room you spend the most time in. Also a must in case the power goes out. You can get good one's from Ace Hardware.
I think this is the simplest thing you can do.
 

Latest posts

Top